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Rational Resources

April 27, 2006 Leave a comment

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  • JDepend: A Java package dependency analyzer that generates design quality metrics.
  • JarAnalyzer: This tool analyzes the relationships among jar files.
  • Metrics plug-in for Eclipse: Calculates cyclomatic complexity and other metrics related to code complexity and coupling.
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Rational Resources

April 27, 2006 Leave a comment

Learn

Get products and technologies

  • JDepend: A Java package dependency analyzer that generates design quality metrics.
  • JarAnalyzer: This tool analyzes the relationships among jar files.
  • Metrics plug-in for Eclipse: Calculates cyclomatic complexity and other metrics related to code complexity and coupling.
Categories: Uncategorized

Politics this week: 22nd – 28th April 2006

April 27, 2006 Leave a comment

Politics this week

Apr 27th 2006
From The Economist print edition

EPA
EPA

The king of Nepal bowed to weeks of street protests and announced the recall of parliament, suspended for the past four years. Maoist rebels called a three-month ceasefire, while demanding elections to an assembly that would draw up a new constitution. See articleE+

Sri Lanka’s armed forces launched heavy attacks against Tamil Tiger rebels in the east of the country, following a suicide-bombing that gravely injured the army’s chief of staff and killed several of his bodyguards. See articleE+

The prime minister of the Solomon Islands was forced out of office, a week after his election prompted riots that wrecked the country’s capital, Honiara. See articleE+

Thailand’s judges were due to meet, at the request of the king, to untangle the mess caused by an election that the opposition boycotted and that has failed to produce a quorum for parliament.

China’s president, Hu Jintao, completed a week-long tour of Africa, his second in three years, showing the importance that China attaches to the continent as a source of oil and raw materials. During the visit, he signed a deal with Nigeria for four oil-drilling licences, committing China to invest $4 billion in infrastructure projects in the country.

George Bush picked Tony Snow, a broadcaster on the stridently conservative Fox News network, as the White House’s new press spokesman. Meanwhile, Mr Bush’s job approval rating slipped to another low: 32%, according to a poll for CNN. See articleE+

Karl Rove gave testimony to a second grand jury investigating the Plame affair. The first grand jury brought charges against “Scooter” Libby, Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, but prosecutors left the door open on further indictments.

Mr Bush went to California, where he called on Congress to pass a bill giving official status to illegal immigrants and said punitive measures being pushed by some congressmen were “unrealistic”.

In New Orleans’s primary election for mayor, Ray Nagin, the incumbent, received 38% of the vote. He now faces Mitch Landrieu, Louisiana’s lieutenant-governor, in a run-off on May 20th.

After months of bickering, Larry Silverstein agreed to a deal that reduces his role in the development of the World Trade Centre site in New York. The developer will cede control of the pivotal Freedom Tower to the city’s port authority after it is built.

EPA
EPA

Panama announced a plan to double the capacity of the Panama Canal to accommodate giant container-ships. The project, due to be completed by 2014, is expected to cost $5.3 billion and will be paid for by toll increases. The plan will probably be put to a national referendum this year.

Kofi Annan, the UN secretary-general, hailed Haiti‘s peaceful parliamentary elections as a crucial step on the road to stability. President René Préval is expected to form a coalition government. See articleE+

EPA
EPA

A series of events were held in Ukraine to mark the 20th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, when a nuclear reactor blew up on April 26th 1986. President Viktor Yushchenko joined ceremonies in memory of those who died, or still suffer, from radiation exposure. In neighbouring Belarus, opposition groups used the occasion to renew protests against the government of Alyaksandr Lukashenka.

Hungary’s Socialist-led government was re-elected to office. The prime minister, Ferenc Gyurcsany, promised to deal with the country’s economic problems, but foreign investors remain fretful about huge budget and current-account deficits. See articleE+

Members of the European Parliament were outraged by claims that the city of Strasbourg was overcharging them for rent for two of their buildings. Most MEPs would rather relocate entirely to Brussels; only the determined opposition of the French government forces them to meet every month in Strasbourg.

Rumblings over Russian gas exports to the European Union continued. Gazprom, Russia’s energy giant, denied that it had made threats to shift supplies to other customers even though Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, later appeared to repeat them. The Russians insist they should be able to buy European energy companies even while rejecting demands for more liberalised energy markets. See articleE+

In Iraq, Jawad al-Maliki, who took over as prime minister after Ibrahim al-Jaafari was at last persuaded to step aside, said he hopes to form a government in about two weeks. See articleE+

A deal between Ehud Olmert, the head of the Kadima party, and Amir Peretz, the head of Labour, under which Mr Peretz is to be the new defence minister, opened the way for a new Israeli government. See article

In the third terrorist attack in 18 months on Egypt‘s Red Sea coast, three suicide-bombers attacked the quiet resort of Dahab, killing at least 24 people, most of them Egyptians. This was followed by two suicide-bomb attacks on the Sinai base of an international peacekeeping group that killed only the perpetrators. See articleE+

Both Osama bin Laden and Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, al-Qaeda’s leader in Iraq, made appeals to Muslims to support the group’s war with the West: Mr bin Laden on an audiotape and Mr Zarqawi in a video posted on the internet.

The UN Security Council passed a resolution imposing travel and financial sanctions on four Sudanese, including a former commander of the air force and a leader of a pro-government militia, accused of war crimes in Sudan’s Darfur region. It is the first time that any individuals involved in the Darfur conflict have been held directly responsible for their actions.

A group of public-health experts attacked the World Bank for incompetence, falsification of statistics and medical malpractice in its attempt to tackle malaria, a preventable disease which kills over a million people each year, many in Africa. The charges, and a rebuttal from the bank, were published in the Lancet to coincide with Africa Malaria Day. The bank admits past incompetence, but argues its new malaria policy is more outcome-based and transparent than critics acknowledge.

Categories: Uncategorized

Politics this week: 22nd – 28th April 2006

April 27, 2006 Leave a comment

Politics this week

Apr 27th 2006
From The Economist print edition

EPA
EPA

The king of Nepal bowed to weeks of street protests and announced the recall of parliament, suspended for the past four years. Maoist rebels called a three-month ceasefire, while demanding elections to an assembly that would draw up a new constitution. See articleE+

Sri Lanka’s armed forces launched heavy attacks against Tamil Tiger rebels in the east of the country, following a suicide-bombing that gravely injured the army’s chief of staff and killed several of his bodyguards. See articleE+

The prime minister of the Solomon Islands was forced out of office, a week after his election prompted riots that wrecked the country’s capital, Honiara. See articleE+

Thailand’s judges were due to meet, at the request of the king, to untangle the mess caused by an election that the opposition boycotted and that has failed to produce a quorum for parliament.

China’s president, Hu Jintao, completed a week-long tour of Africa, his second in three years, showing the importance that China attaches to the continent as a source of oil and raw materials. During the visit, he signed a deal with Nigeria for four oil-drilling licences, committing China to invest $4 billion in infrastructure projects in the country.

George Bush picked Tony Snow, a broadcaster on the stridently conservative Fox News network, as the White House’s new press spokesman. Meanwhile, Mr Bush’s job approval rating slipped to another low: 32%, according to a poll for CNN. See articleE+

Karl Rove gave testimony to a second grand jury investigating the Plame affair. The first grand jury brought charges against “Scooter” Libby, Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, but prosecutors left the door open on further indictments.

Mr Bush went to California, where he called on Congress to pass a bill giving official status to illegal immigrants and said punitive measures being pushed by some congressmen were “unrealistic”.

In New Orleans’s primary election for mayor, Ray Nagin, the incumbent, received 38% of the vote. He now faces Mitch Landrieu, Louisiana’s lieutenant-governor, in a run-off on May 20th.

After months of bickering, Larry Silverstein agreed to a deal that reduces his role in the development of the World Trade Centre site in New York. The developer will cede control of the pivotal Freedom Tower to the city’s port authority after it is built.

EPA
EPA

Panama announced a plan to double the capacity of the Panama Canal to accommodate giant container-ships. The project, due to be completed by 2014, is expected to cost $5.3 billion and will be paid for by toll increases. The plan will probably be put to a national referendum this year.

Kofi Annan, the UN secretary-general, hailed Haiti‘s peaceful parliamentary elections as a crucial step on the road to stability. President René Préval is expected to form a coalition government. See articleE+

EPA
EPA

A series of events were held in Ukraine to mark the 20th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, when a nuclear reactor blew up on April 26th 1986. President Viktor Yushchenko joined ceremonies in memory of those who died, or still suffer, from radiation exposure. In neighbouring Belarus, opposition groups used the occasion to renew protests against the government of Alyaksandr Lukashenka.

Hungary’s Socialist-led government was re-elected to office. The prime minister, Ferenc Gyurcsany, promised to deal with the country’s economic problems, but foreign investors remain fretful about huge budget and current-account deficits. See articleE+

Members of the European Parliament were outraged by claims that the city of Strasbourg was overcharging them for rent for two of their buildings. Most MEPs would rather relocate entirely to Brussels; only the determined opposition of the French government forces them to meet every month in Strasbourg.

Rumblings over Russian gas exports to the European Union continued. Gazprom, Russia’s energy giant, denied that it had made threats to shift supplies to other customers even though Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, later appeared to repeat them. The Russians insist they should be able to buy European energy companies even while rejecting demands for more liberalised energy markets. See articleE+

In Iraq, Jawad al-Maliki, who took over as prime minister after Ibrahim al-Jaafari was at last persuaded to step aside, said he hopes to form a government in about two weeks. See articleE+

A deal between Ehud Olmert, the head of the Kadima party, and Amir Peretz, the head of Labour, under which Mr Peretz is to be the new defence minister, opened the way for a new Israeli government. See article

In the third terrorist attack in 18 months on Egypt‘s Red Sea coast, three suicide-bombers attacked the quiet resort of Dahab, killing at least 24 people, most of them Egyptians. This was followed by two suicide-bomb attacks on the Sinai base of an international peacekeeping group that killed only the perpetrators. See articleE+

Both Osama bin Laden and Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, al-Qaeda’s leader in Iraq, made appeals to Muslims to support the group’s war with the West: Mr bin Laden on an audiotape and Mr Zarqawi in a video posted on the internet.

The UN Security Council passed a resolution imposing travel and financial sanctions on four Sudanese, including a former commander of the air force and a leader of a pro-government militia, accused of war crimes in Sudan’s Darfur region. It is the first time that any individuals involved in the Darfur conflict have been held directly responsible for their actions.

A group of public-health experts attacked the World Bank for incompetence, falsification of statistics and medical malpractice in its attempt to tackle malaria, a preventable disease which kills over a million people each year, many in Africa. The charges, and a rebuttal from the bank, were published in the Lancet to coincide with Africa Malaria Day. The bank admits past incompetence, but argues its new malaria policy is more outcome-based and transparent than critics acknowledge.

Categories: Uncategorized

Business this week: 22nd – 28th April 2006

April 27, 2006 Leave a comment

Business this week

Apr 27th 2006
From The Economist print edition

The European Union’s second-highest court heard an appeal from Microsoft that seeks to overturn the antitrust ruling imposed in 2004. The software company denied it had breached EU competition rules by, among other things, bundling its Media Player into Windows. The court should give its decision by the end of the year.

Sun Microsystems announced that Jonathan Schwartz, number two at the struggling maker of high-end computers, would replace Scott McNealy as chief executive. Mr McNealy, who co-founded the company and has held the post since 1984, will stay on as chairman. Sun has struggled in vain to reinvent itself since the bursting of the dotcom bubble.

Blackstone Group is to take a 4.5% strategic stake in Deutsche Telekom for euro2.7 billion ($3.3 billion). Germany’s new government welcomed the move. A ruckus ensued in the run-up to last year’s general election when foreign-investment firms were compared to “swarms of locusts”.

Kenneth Lay took the stand at the Enron trial. The firm’s former chairman and chief executive blamed Andrew Fastow, the former chief financial officer who struck a plea-bargain deal with prosecutors, for the fraud that led to the energy-trader’s collapse and said a media “witch hunt” fed a hostile investment environment before Enron’s bankruptcy. Mr Lay denies charges of trying to cover up the perilous state of Enron’s finances.

There was further consolidation in the infrastructure industry as Spain’s Abertis agreed to merge with Italy’s Autostrade. The combined company, valued at around euro25 billion ($31 billion), will be the world’s largest operator of toll-roads. Its assets are mostly in Italy, Spain and France, but also include the Dulles Greenway toll-road leading to Washington’s international airport. See articleE+

Nissan and Honda continued the recent success of Japanese carmakers by reporting record net profits for the year ending March 31st. Honda’s fourth-quarter profit rose by 133% compared with a year earlier. The news provided sharp contrast to the fortunes of Detroit. Last week, General Motors reported its sixth straight quarterly loss (though at $323m, the result was better than expected) and Ford announced its biggest quarterly loss in four years—$1.19 billion—as it took charges for its restructuring plans.

Bucking the trend of most large airlines worldwide, Emirates reported a net profit of 2.5 billion dirhams ($674m) for the year ending March 31st—its 18th consecutive annual profit—despite an increase in fuel costs. Based in Dubai, Emirates is planning to double in size over the next few years the better to compete on long-haul routes.

In a long-running takeover battle, Engelhard, a maker of catalytic converters, rejected a sweetened takeover offer from BASF and will buy back 20% of its outstanding shares to defend itself against the German chemical company’s bid.

Reynolds American (the parent company of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco) agreed to pay $3.5 billion for Conwood, a maker of smokeless-tobacco products that traces its origins back to snuff manufacturing in the late 18th century. Although cigarette consumption is declining, the market for smokeless (mostly snuff and chewable) tobacco, such as Conwood’s Kodiak brand, has been growing at 5% a year.

In an effort to control a racing economy, China’s central bank raised interest rates for the first time in 18 months. It also announced guidelines to rein in banks’ lending. See articleE+

Speculation that a silver-backed exchange-traded fund from Barclays Global Investors will soon be launched helped the price of silver claw back some of its recent loss. Investors cashing in profits from record highs contributed to volatile trading that had seen the metal fall by 15% on April 21st.

Three-month copper futures broke the $7,000 a tonne barrier amid concern of strikes at mines in Chile and Mexico.

BP announced that net income for the first quarter had fallen by 15% in a year, to $5.6 billion. The company’s profit was partly affected by last year’s shutdown of its oil refinery at Texas City following an explosion that killed 15 people. This week federal regulators fined BP‘s North American operations $2.4m for safety violations at a refinery in Ohio that were “similar to those found during an investigation” of the fatal blast.

The price of oil eased a little after touching $75 a barrel in trading late last week. Meanwhile, George Bush said he was suspending deposits to America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve until the autumn in an effort to boost oil supplies. The move (which will have a small effect on overall oil supply) comes amid growing political pressure in the United States over high petrol prices. See article

Categories: Uncategorized

Business this week: 22nd – 28th April 2006

April 27, 2006 Leave a comment

Business this week

Apr 27th 2006
From The Economist print edition

The European Union’s second-highest court heard an appeal from Microsoft that seeks to overturn the antitrust ruling imposed in 2004. The software company denied it had breached EU competition rules by, among other things, bundling its Media Player into Windows. The court should give its decision by the end of the year.

Sun Microsystems announced that Jonathan Schwartz, number two at the struggling maker of high-end computers, would replace Scott McNealy as chief executive. Mr McNealy, who co-founded the company and has held the post since 1984, will stay on as chairman. Sun has struggled in vain to reinvent itself since the bursting of the dotcom bubble.

Blackstone Group is to take a 4.5% strategic stake in Deutsche Telekom for euro2.7 billion ($3.3 billion). Germany’s new government welcomed the move. A ruckus ensued in the run-up to last year’s general election when foreign-investment firms were compared to “swarms of locusts”.

Kenneth Lay took the stand at the Enron trial. The firm’s former chairman and chief executive blamed Andrew Fastow, the former chief financial officer who struck a plea-bargain deal with prosecutors, for the fraud that led to the energy-trader’s collapse and said a media “witch hunt” fed a hostile investment environment before Enron’s bankruptcy. Mr Lay denies charges of trying to cover up the perilous state of Enron’s finances.

There was further consolidation in the infrastructure industry as Spain’s Abertis agreed to merge with Italy’s Autostrade. The combined company, valued at around euro25 billion ($31 billion), will be the world’s largest operator of toll-roads. Its assets are mostly in Italy, Spain and France, but also include the Dulles Greenway toll-road leading to Washington’s international airport. See articleE+

Nissan and Honda continued the recent success of Japanese carmakers by reporting record net profits for the year ending March 31st. Honda’s fourth-quarter profit rose by 133% compared with a year earlier. The news provided sharp contrast to the fortunes of Detroit. Last week, General Motors reported its sixth straight quarterly loss (though at $323m, the result was better than expected) and Ford announced its biggest quarterly loss in four years—$1.19 billion—as it took charges for its restructuring plans.

Bucking the trend of most large airlines worldwide, Emirates reported a net profit of 2.5 billion dirhams ($674m) for the year ending March 31st—its 18th consecutive annual profit—despite an increase in fuel costs. Based in Dubai, Emirates is planning to double in size over the next few years the better to compete on long-haul routes.

In a long-running takeover battle, Engelhard, a maker of catalytic converters, rejected a sweetened takeover offer from BASF and will buy back 20% of its outstanding shares to defend itself against the German chemical company’s bid.

Reynolds American (the parent company of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco) agreed to pay $3.5 billion for Conwood, a maker of smokeless-tobacco products that traces its origins back to snuff manufacturing in the late 18th century. Although cigarette consumption is declining, the market for smokeless (mostly snuff and chewable) tobacco, such as Conwood’s Kodiak brand, has been growing at 5% a year.

In an effort to control a racing economy, China’s central bank raised interest rates for the first time in 18 months. It also announced guidelines to rein in banks’ lending. See articleE+

Speculation that a silver-backed exchange-traded fund from Barclays Global Investors will soon be launched helped the price of silver claw back some of its recent loss. Investors cashing in profits from record highs contributed to volatile trading that had seen the metal fall by 15% on April 21st.

Three-month copper futures broke the $7,000 a tonne barrier amid concern of strikes at mines in Chile and Mexico.

BP announced that net income for the first quarter had fallen by 15% in a year, to $5.6 billion. The company’s profit was partly affected by last year’s shutdown of its oil refinery at Texas City following an explosion that killed 15 people. This week federal regulators fined BP‘s North American operations $2.4m for safety violations at a refinery in Ohio that were “similar to those found during an investigation” of the fatal blast.

The price of oil eased a little after touching $75 a barrel in trading late last week. Meanwhile, George Bush said he was suspending deposits to America’s Strategic Petroleum Reserve until the autumn in an effort to boost oil supplies. The move (which will have a small effect on overall oil supply) comes amid growing political pressure in the United States over high petrol prices. See article

Categories: Uncategorized