Archive

Archive for May 2, 2006

FOREIGN POLICY’s May/June 2006 Issue

Sudan, which wreaks havoc on its own citizens, is the country in greatest danger of collapse. And Iraq—America’s greatest foreign investment in decades—isn’t far behind. In the second annual Failed States Index, FOREIGN POLICY and the Fund for Peace rank more than 60 countries—and tell you which ones are on the brink of collapse. Find out who has improved (Bosnia and Herzegovina), which ones may be spiraling out of control (Zimbabwe), and whether voting makes things better or worse (sometimes).

By Thomas L. Friedman
Iran’s president denies the Holocaust, Hugo Chávez tells Western leaders to go to hell, and Vladimir Putin is cracking the whip. Why? They know that the price of oil and the pace of freedom always move in opposite directions. It’s the First Law of Petropolitics, and it may be the axiom to explain our age.

By Lt. Gen. William E. Odom (Ret.)
Why the arguments for staying in Iraq don’t add up.

By Christopher Dickey
Iran is commanding the world’s attention as the ayatollahs accelerate their race for the bomb. But the timetable for talks—or a nuclear crisis—is not being shaped by centrifuges, uranium, or reactors. It’s about the security that only oil can provide. Plus: Sizing up Iran’s military

By Douglas McGray
Speak two language and you’re bilingual. Speak one? You must be American. So goes the old joke. But globalization means that students can no longer remain blissfully unaware. Can Americans open the classroom door, or will today’s youth be unprepared to lead tomorrow’s world?

By Anirudh Krishna
Don’t just lift people out of poverty. Stop them from falling into it.

In “The Dark Side of China’s Rise” (March/April 2006), Minxin Pei described a country crippled by leaders who care more about riches than reform. That portrayal ruffled the feathers of those who believe China is the world’s next superpower. Which is it? A handful of prominent scholars look at whether China is rising or falling.

By Rob Long
The movie industry’s top stars are tackling the world’s problems. But do they know their lines? Here’s how they can make a difference—without making fools of themselves.

In Other Words

Global Newsstand

Net Effect

Missing Links

By Moisés Naím
Economic disparities have not changed. Our tolerance for them has.

Categories: Uncategorized

FOREIGN POLICY’s May/June 2006 Issue

Sudan, which wreaks havoc on its own citizens, is the country in greatest danger of collapse. And Iraq—America’s greatest foreign investment in decades—isn’t far behind. In the second annual Failed States Index, FOREIGN POLICY and the Fund for Peace rank more than 60 countries—and tell you which ones are on the brink of collapse. Find out who has improved (Bosnia and Herzegovina), which ones may be spiraling out of control (Zimbabwe), and whether voting makes things better or worse (sometimes).

By Thomas L. Friedman
Iran’s president denies the Holocaust, Hugo Chávez tells Western leaders to go to hell, and Vladimir Putin is cracking the whip. Why? They know that the price of oil and the pace of freedom always move in opposite directions. It’s the First Law of Petropolitics, and it may be the axiom to explain our age.

By Lt. Gen. William E. Odom (Ret.)
Why the arguments for staying in Iraq don’t add up.

By Christopher Dickey
Iran is commanding the world’s attention as the ayatollahs accelerate their race for the bomb. But the timetable for talks—or a nuclear crisis—is not being shaped by centrifuges, uranium, or reactors. It’s about the security that only oil can provide. Plus: Sizing up Iran’s military

By Douglas McGray
Speak two language and you’re bilingual. Speak one? You must be American. So goes the old joke. But globalization means that students can no longer remain blissfully unaware. Can Americans open the classroom door, or will today’s youth be unprepared to lead tomorrow’s world?

By Anirudh Krishna
Don’t just lift people out of poverty. Stop them from falling into it.

In “The Dark Side of China’s Rise” (March/April 2006), Minxin Pei described a country crippled by leaders who care more about riches than reform. That portrayal ruffled the feathers of those who believe China is the world’s next superpower. Which is it? A handful of prominent scholars look at whether China is rising or falling.

By Rob Long
The movie industry’s top stars are tackling the world’s problems. But do they know their lines? Here’s how they can make a difference—without making fools of themselves.

In Other Words

Global Newsstand

Net Effect

Missing Links

By Moisés Naím
Economic disparities have not changed. Our tolerance for them has.

Categories: Uncategorized