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Archive for May, 2006

List of Ministers and their portfolios

May 15, 2006 Leave a comment

M. Karunanidhi, Chief Minister: Public, General Administration, Indian Administrative Service, Indian Police Service, Other All India Services, Prevention of Corruption, District Revenue Officers, Home, Police, Industries, Information Technology, Mines and Minerals, Prohibition and Excise, Molasses, Minorities Welfare, Tamil Official Language and Tamil Culture and Passports.

K. Anbazhagan, Finance Minister: Finance, Planning, Legislature and Elections.

Arcot N. Veerasamy, Electricity and Rural Industries Minister: Electricity, Non-Conventional Energy Development, Rural Industries including Cottage Industries, Small Scale Industries.

M.K. Stalin, Local Administration Minister: Municipal Administration, Rural Development, Panchayats and Panchayat Unions, Poverty Alleviation Programmes, Rural Indebtedness, Urban and Rural Water Supply.

Ko.Si. Mani, Cooperation Minister: Cooperation and Statistics.

Veerapandi S. Arumugam, Agriculture Minister: Agriculture, Agriculture Engineering, Agro Service Cooperatives, Horticulture, Sugarcane cess and Sugarcane Development.

Durai Murugan, PWD Minister: Public Works, Irrigation including Minor Irrigation and Programme Works.

P.T.R. Palanivel Rajan, HR&CE Minister: Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments.

K. Ponmudi, Higher Education Minister: Higher Education including Technical Education, Electronics, Science and Technology and Ex-Servicemen Welfare.

K.N. Nehru, Transport Minister: Transport, Nationalised Transport, Motor Vehicles Act.

M.R.K. Panneerselvam, Backward Classes Minister: Backward Classes, Most Backward Classes and Denotified Communities, Overseas Indians, Refugees and Evacuees, Registration, Stamp Act.

I. Periasami, Revenue and Law Minister: Revenue, Revenue Establishment, Deputy Collectors. Law and Courts, Prisons, Legislation on Weights and Measures, Registration of Companies, Debt Relief including legislation of Money lending and Legislation on Chits.

N. Suresh Rajan, Tourism Minister: Tourism and Tourism Development Corporation

Parithi Ilamvazhuthi, Information and Publicity Minister: Information and Publicity, Film Technology and Cinematography Act, Stationery and Printing and Government Press, Urban Development, Town Planning and CMDA.

E.V. Velu, Food Minister: Food, Civil Supplies, Consumer Protection and Price Control.

Suba Thangavelan, Housing Minister: Housing, Housing Development, and Rural Housing Development

K.K.S.S.R. Ramachandran, Health Minister: Health, Medical Education and Family Welfare.

T.M. Anbarasan, Labour Minister: Labour, Census, Employment and Training, Iron and Steel Control, Newsprint Control and Urban Employment schemes.

K.R. Periakaruppan, Slum Clearance Board Minister: Slum Clearance Board, Accommodation Control and Waste Land Development.

N.K.K.P. Raja, Handlooms Minister: Handlooms and Textiles.

Thangam Thennarasu, School Education Minister: School Education, Archaeology.

S.N.M. Ubayadullah, Commercial Taxes Minister: Commercial Taxes.

T.P.M. Mohideen Khan, Environment Minister: Sports and Youth Welfare, Environment and Pollution Control and Wakfs.

N. Selvaraj, Forests Minister: Forests and Cinchona.

M.P. Saminathan, Highways Minister: Highways and Ports.

Poongothai, Social Welfare Minister: Social Welfare including Women’s and Children’s Welfare, Nutritious Noon Meal, Welfare of the Disabled, Orphanages and Correctional Administration, ICDS and Beggar Homes.

Geetha Jeevan, Animal Husbandry Minister: Animal Husbandry.

Tamilarasi, Adi Dravidar Welfare Minister: Adi Dravidar Welfare, Hill Tribes, Bonded Labour.

K.P.P. Sami, Fisheries Minister: Fisheries and Fisheries Development Corporation.

U. Mathivanan, Dairy Development Minister: Milk and Dairy Development. K. Ramachandran, Khadi Board Minister: Khadi Board, Bhoodan and Gramdhan.

Categories: Uncategorized

List of Ministers and their portfolios

May 15, 2006 Leave a comment

M. Karunanidhi, Chief Minister: Public, General Administration, Indian Administrative Service, Indian Police Service, Other All India Services, Prevention of Corruption, District Revenue Officers, Home, Police, Industries, Information Technology, Mines and Minerals, Prohibition and Excise, Molasses, Minorities Welfare, Tamil Official Language and Tamil Culture and Passports.

K. Anbazhagan, Finance Minister: Finance, Planning, Legislature and Elections.

Arcot N. Veerasamy, Electricity and Rural Industries Minister: Electricity, Non-Conventional Energy Development, Rural Industries including Cottage Industries, Small Scale Industries.

M.K. Stalin, Local Administration Minister: Municipal Administration, Rural Development, Panchayats and Panchayat Unions, Poverty Alleviation Programmes, Rural Indebtedness, Urban and Rural Water Supply.

Ko.Si. Mani, Cooperation Minister: Cooperation and Statistics.

Veerapandi S. Arumugam, Agriculture Minister: Agriculture, Agriculture Engineering, Agro Service Cooperatives, Horticulture, Sugarcane cess and Sugarcane Development.

Durai Murugan, PWD Minister: Public Works, Irrigation including Minor Irrigation and Programme Works.

P.T.R. Palanivel Rajan, HR&CE Minister: Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments.

K. Ponmudi, Higher Education Minister: Higher Education including Technical Education, Electronics, Science and Technology and Ex-Servicemen Welfare.

K.N. Nehru, Transport Minister: Transport, Nationalised Transport, Motor Vehicles Act.

M.R.K. Panneerselvam, Backward Classes Minister: Backward Classes, Most Backward Classes and Denotified Communities, Overseas Indians, Refugees and Evacuees, Registration, Stamp Act.

I. Periasami, Revenue and Law Minister: Revenue, Revenue Establishment, Deputy Collectors. Law and Courts, Prisons, Legislation on Weights and Measures, Registration of Companies, Debt Relief including legislation of Money lending and Legislation on Chits.

N. Suresh Rajan, Tourism Minister: Tourism and Tourism Development Corporation

Parithi Ilamvazhuthi, Information and Publicity Minister: Information and Publicity, Film Technology and Cinematography Act, Stationery and Printing and Government Press, Urban Development, Town Planning and CMDA.

E.V. Velu, Food Minister: Food, Civil Supplies, Consumer Protection and Price Control.

Suba Thangavelan, Housing Minister: Housing, Housing Development, and Rural Housing Development

K.K.S.S.R. Ramachandran, Health Minister: Health, Medical Education and Family Welfare.

T.M. Anbarasan, Labour Minister: Labour, Census, Employment and Training, Iron and Steel Control, Newsprint Control and Urban Employment schemes.

K.R. Periakaruppan, Slum Clearance Board Minister: Slum Clearance Board, Accommodation Control and Waste Land Development.

N.K.K.P. Raja, Handlooms Minister: Handlooms and Textiles.

Thangam Thennarasu, School Education Minister: School Education, Archaeology.

S.N.M. Ubayadullah, Commercial Taxes Minister: Commercial Taxes.

T.P.M. Mohideen Khan, Environment Minister: Sports and Youth Welfare, Environment and Pollution Control and Wakfs.

N. Selvaraj, Forests Minister: Forests and Cinchona.

M.P. Saminathan, Highways Minister: Highways and Ports.

Poongothai, Social Welfare Minister: Social Welfare including Women’s and Children’s Welfare, Nutritious Noon Meal, Welfare of the Disabled, Orphanages and Correctional Administration, ICDS and Beggar Homes.

Geetha Jeevan, Animal Husbandry Minister: Animal Husbandry.

Tamilarasi, Adi Dravidar Welfare Minister: Adi Dravidar Welfare, Hill Tribes, Bonded Labour.

K.P.P. Sami, Fisheries Minister: Fisheries and Fisheries Development Corporation.

U. Mathivanan, Dairy Development Minister: Milk and Dairy Development. K. Ramachandran, Khadi Board Minister: Khadi Board, Bhoodan and Gramdhan.

Categories: Uncategorized

Direct Web Remoting

May 12, 2006 Leave a comment

Introduction to Ajax and DWR

There are a number of documents to help you get started with DWR. If you are new to Ajax, you can start with the introduction to Ajax and then the overview of DWR.

There is a basic getting started guide which shows how to install DWR and to view your first page. There is then a series of examples to demonstrate basic functionality, some hints and tips, and a page on common errors and how to fix them.

Outside of this site there is a growing collection of tutorials from around the web and several people are giving talks and seminars about DWR.

Reference Documents

The detailed servlet configuring options is in the WEB-INF configuration.

The dwr.xml section explains about Converters, Creators and Signatures in detail. This section is a must read for understanding what you can do with DWR.

From DWR 2.0 (currently in development) you can also configure DWR using Annotations.

There is also a small collection of generated documents from things like JavaDoc.

Scripting the Browser

The scripting introduction gets you started with how to write Javascript code to call your Java code. DWR comes with 2 Javascript libraries to help you:

  • engine.js: Handles all server communication
  • util.js: Helps you alter web pages with the data you got from the server (and a few neat extras too)

DWR is not a generic Javascript library so we try to steer clear of functions that are not specific to remoting functionality, however there are a few functions that sneak into util.js to make life a lot easier.

It is common to need to pass extra data to callback methods and there is also a reference to how to handle errors too.

Integration

DWR integrates with a large number of other projects. A common query is how to get at servlet objects like HttpServletRequest, which is explained in accessing servlet objects. DWR comes with some integration with Spring and Hibernate and there are notes on integrating with Struts too.

Externally, there is some information about integrating DWR with AppFuse written by Life as a struct.

In addition there are a number of projects that complement or compete with DWR that you can find out about in related projects.

Other Documents

Things that don’t fit into any of the above categories:

A table of contents without descriptions follows:

Categories: Uncategorized

Direct Web Remoting

May 12, 2006 Leave a comment

Introduction to Ajax and DWR

There are a number of documents to help you get started with DWR. If you are new to Ajax, you can start with the introduction to Ajax and then the overview of DWR.

There is a basic getting started guide which shows how to install DWR and to view your first page. There is then a series of examples to demonstrate basic functionality, some hints and tips, and a page on common errors and how to fix them.

Outside of this site there is a growing collection of tutorials from around the web and several people are giving talks and seminars about DWR.

Reference Documents

The detailed servlet configuring options is in the WEB-INF configuration.

The dwr.xml section explains about Converters, Creators and Signatures in detail. This section is a must read for understanding what you can do with DWR.

From DWR 2.0 (currently in development) you can also configure DWR using Annotations.

There is also a small collection of generated documents from things like JavaDoc.

Scripting the Browser

The scripting introduction gets you started with how to write Javascript code to call your Java code. DWR comes with 2 Javascript libraries to help you:

  • engine.js: Handles all server communication
  • util.js: Helps you alter web pages with the data you got from the server (and a few neat extras too)

DWR is not a generic Javascript library so we try to steer clear of functions that are not specific to remoting functionality, however there are a few functions that sneak into util.js to make life a lot easier.

It is common to need to pass extra data to callback methods and there is also a reference to how to handle errors too.

Integration

DWR integrates with a large number of other projects. A common query is how to get at servlet objects like HttpServletRequest, which is explained in accessing servlet objects. DWR comes with some integration with Spring and Hibernate and there are notes on integrating with Struts too.

Externally, there is some information about integrating DWR with AppFuse written by Life as a struct.

In addition there are a number of projects that complement or compete with DWR that you can find out about in related projects.

Other Documents

Things that don’t fit into any of the above categories:

A table of contents without descriptions follows:

Categories: Uncategorized

May 8 – May 12, 2006

May 12, 2006 Leave a comment

It’s E3 time again in Los Angeles where a game-mad crowd goes wild. Engadget spotted the new Dell gaming boxes—but there are no specs, so is this just an attempt to justify the investment in Alienware? Meanwhile Alienware lost no time blasting out game notebooks with wireless that’s even faster than wired. Microsoft’s coming out with an HD DVD player for Xbox 360 this holiday—but no specs on that either. Sony is throwing gamers a PlayStation 3 console the size of a waffle iron (via Kotaku) though Engadget has sticker shock over the $500 price for a crippled version.

 Also new at E3: Nintendo’s Wii controller with built-in speaker for nearly 3D sound; the Xbox 360 Live Vision, headset and racing wheel Logitech’s G25 steering system; and the Xbox 360 can take your mug shot and superimpose it on your on-screen avatar—creepy. Resident Evil 4 is headed for Wii and get ready for Grand Theft Auto 4 in October 2007. Engadget and Joystiq editor Vlad Cole wraps up Tuesday’s Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony action with a podcast here and Kotaku has Day One photos from the floor.

The other L.A. story: the juggernaut continues. MySpace rolls out a new, ad-supported IM product to compete with AOL writes Micro Persuasion. Mashable! has a review and screenshots. Meanwhile Paidcontent blogs that Microsoft’s Windows Live Messenger has been tested by millions and is now in public beta, while TechCrunch reviews the AIM MySpace Killer that AOL doesn’t know how to profit from just yet.

 Other Web 2.0 shorts: TechCrunch calls it Seth Godin’s purple albatross and explains why Squidoo won’t work. Scott Blum, founder of Buy.com launches a new video startup. Tech memeorandum becomes techmeme. This year’s Webby Awards go to… the same old same old. And here’s a first in the blogging world: The NBA fined Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $200,000 for criticizing league officials on his blog reports Blogebrity.

Google Press Day happened Wednesday and despite an initial lack of wifi in Mountain View, Om Malik tried to get some early word out on his Crackberry. For those who couldn’t be there, Niall Kennedy wraps up new Google products like Google Co-op (social search and tagging), Google Desktop 4, Google Trends (on-demand Zeitgeist), and Google Notebook (a _JavaScript scratchpad). Meanwhile as you read this, Mountain View insiders like Sergey and Larry are dumping Google stock so quickly that they’re causing a visible spike in income taxes collected by California this year: approximately 1/8th of the state’s entire $4 billion take (via Valleywag).

 Finally in entertainment, David Blaine, the guy in the giant water-filled snowglobe in New York City, nearly died trying to trying to break the world breath-hold record says Gothamist. He was 1:50 short, his skin was peeling and he was unconscious by the time divers fished him out, blogs The Superficial. Britney Spears admitted what everyone already knows to David Letterman: yes, sir she’s pregnant. But other rumors also fly: that Spears is preparing to dump hubby Federline with an out-of-nowhere divorce. Finally, Nicole Kidman still loves Tom Cruise but bloggers don’t. Did they doom M:i:III? PerezHilton.com celebrated Mission Impossible 3’s unexpectedly low opening weekend box-office sales and urged readers to boycott. Of course, it’s still $48 million film and one Scientologist bought a 500-seat block of MI:3 tickets at Hollywood’s Arclight. On the bright side for Tom: US Weekly compares his approval rating to Bush’s and notes that Tom’s is slightly higher.

Categories: Uncategorized

May 8 – May 12, 2006

May 12, 2006 Leave a comment

It’s E3 time again in Los Angeles where a game-mad crowd goes wild. Engadget spotted the new Dell gaming boxes—but there are no specs, so is this just an attempt to justify the investment in Alienware? Meanwhile Alienware lost no time blasting out game notebooks with wireless that’s even faster than wired. Microsoft’s coming out with an HD DVD player for Xbox 360 this holiday—but no specs on that either. Sony is throwing gamers a PlayStation 3 console the size of a waffle iron (via Kotaku) though Engadget has sticker shock over the $500 price for a crippled version.

 Also new at E3: Nintendo’s Wii controller with built-in speaker for nearly 3D sound; the Xbox 360 Live Vision, headset and racing wheel Logitech’s G25 steering system; and the Xbox 360 can take your mug shot and superimpose it on your on-screen avatar—creepy. Resident Evil 4 is headed for Wii and get ready for Grand Theft Auto 4 in October 2007. Engadget and Joystiq editor Vlad Cole wraps up Tuesday’s Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony action with a podcast here and Kotaku has Day One photos from the floor.

The other L.A. story: the juggernaut continues. MySpace rolls out a new, ad-supported IM product to compete with AOL writes Micro Persuasion. Mashable! has a review and screenshots. Meanwhile Paidcontent blogs that Microsoft’s Windows Live Messenger has been tested by millions and is now in public beta, while TechCrunch reviews the AIM MySpace Killer that AOL doesn’t know how to profit from just yet.

 Other Web 2.0 shorts: TechCrunch calls it Seth Godin’s purple albatross and explains why Squidoo won’t work. Scott Blum, founder of Buy.com launches a new video startup. Tech memeorandum becomes techmeme. This year’s Webby Awards go to… the same old same old. And here’s a first in the blogging world: The NBA fined Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $200,000 for criticizing league officials on his blog reports Blogebrity.

Google Press Day happened Wednesday and despite an initial lack of wifi in Mountain View, Om Malik tried to get some early word out on his Crackberry. For those who couldn’t be there, Niall Kennedy wraps up new Google products like Google Co-op (social search and tagging), Google Desktop 4, Google Trends (on-demand Zeitgeist), and Google Notebook (a _JavaScript scratchpad). Meanwhile as you read this, Mountain View insiders like Sergey and Larry are dumping Google stock so quickly that they’re causing a visible spike in income taxes collected by California this year: approximately 1/8th of the state’s entire $4 billion take (via Valleywag).

 Finally in entertainment, David Blaine, the guy in the giant water-filled snowglobe in New York City, nearly died trying to trying to break the world breath-hold record says Gothamist. He was 1:50 short, his skin was peeling and he was unconscious by the time divers fished him out, blogs The Superficial. Britney Spears admitted what everyone already knows to David Letterman: yes, sir she’s pregnant. But other rumors also fly: that Spears is preparing to dump hubby Federline with an out-of-nowhere divorce. Finally, Nicole Kidman still loves Tom Cruise but bloggers don’t. Did they doom M:i:III? PerezHilton.com celebrated Mission Impossible 3’s unexpectedly low opening weekend box-office sales and urged readers to boycott. Of course, it’s still $48 million film and one Scientologist bought a 500-seat block of MI:3 tickets at Hollywood’s Arclight. On the bright side for Tom: US Weekly compares his approval rating to Bush’s and notes that Tom’s is slightly higher.

Categories: Uncategorized

May 1 – May 5, 2006

May 11, 2006 Leave a comment

Call it the Return of the Beast, blogs Om Malik, who sees Microsoft awakening from its slumber to crush Google—just like Netscape. First step: Make Microsoft’s search engine the default in Explorer. Google’s objecting, but Clickety Clack writes that this setting is easy to change, just like Firefox’s default setting for Google, so what’s the problem? Cry me a river, Google, writes Jeremy Zawodny, who reminds us that Google bought its way into the Firefox default with a revenue-sharing agreement. It’s only when someone else plays browser games that default becomes a big deal.

 Second step: Find (or buy) allies. With Google’s dominance of search increasing, BetaNews reports Microsoft has been discussing acquiring a stake in Yahoo. Not everyone in Redmond is on board, but search is going to be commoditized someday, so Microsoft should spend what it takes to catch up. And it is. NYTimes reports that Microsoft spending will rise sharply next year, more than $2 billion over previous estimates, to address the threat. Third step: Get others to replace Google search with MSN Live.com searches, which is what happened with Amazon over the weekend.

People close to Larry and Sergey are worried about Microsoft says John Battelle’s Searchblog. But Google can’t be too concerned since Microsoft announced Windows Vista slipped again to the second quarter of 2007 (via OSNews) and Gartner advises holding off migrating until 2008!

In Web 2.0 news, Yahoo launched it’s first content play in 5 years with a new gadget-review portal called Yahoo Tech. It combines reviews from Consumer Reports, Yahoo users, and in-house advisors like The Mom to compete with Cnet’s reviews. business2blog rounds up a trio of lukewarm reviews. The Spotback personalized news portal launched, claiming to learn from user preferences over time. TechCrunch likes it because users can customize their page, tag stories, ask for more like this, and get Top Stories as rated by all Spotback users. Best of all: no user account because it’s cookie-driven. Michael Arrington also gives the thumbs up to  Sphere, a blog search engine that lets you sort for relevance in lots of ways. Also get ready: Google Press Day is next week and plenty of announcements are expected including Google Health and video in search results says USA Today’s Kevin Maney. What’s next? Google Gum.

And burn rate re-enters the vocabulary as YouTube is rumored to have raised another $25 million in VC while blowing nearly $1 million a month in bandwidth fees alone, writes TechCrunch. At that rate, Valleywag blogs, YouTube will go bankrupt just in time to miss homemade bootlegs of Hillary’s concession speech in 2008.

In politics, the “day without immigrants” went off peacefully as hundreds of thousands rallied around the country for immigrant rights. Daily Kos wraps up major-media coverage here and Facing South covers the thousands who rallied in the Southeast. Up in the Midwest, Michelle Malkin seethes over a University of  Minnesota instructor, Susana De Leon, who used the May Day march to call white people “wetbacks” and posts photos of signs and symbols used by less politically savvy protesters—Che Guevara, anyone? Aztlan?—here and here .

But forget immigration, gas prices, Iran or Iraq. The blogoshphere was aflame over one of the most jaw-dropping public appearances in the modern era. Stephen Colbert is a dangerous man — a bomb thrower, an assassin, a terrorist with boring hair and rimless glasses says Salon and his brilliant performance unplugged the Bush myth machine. His send up of everyone in sight at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner brought a heavily sheltered president face to face with public outrage and revulsion, blogs Scott Rosenberg. But while the Colbert Report may be the best show on television, Colbert’s liberal bias shows through, blogs Huffington Post. Please please, liberals, stop it. You’re embarrassing all of us says Wonkette. It was just a decent standup act with a lousy audience. And it took 4 days but the NY Times finally noticed the ground-breaking, witheringly sarcastic attack says Boing Boing. Catch the whole thing here on Comedy Central Videos.

Categories: Uncategorized

May 1 – May 5, 2006

May 11, 2006 Leave a comment

Call it the Return of the Beast, blogs Om Malik, who sees Microsoft awakening from its slumber to crush Google—just like Netscape. First step: Make Microsoft’s search engine the default in Explorer. Google’s objecting, but Clickety Clack writes that this setting is easy to change, just like Firefox’s default setting for Google, so what’s the problem? Cry me a river, Google, writes Jeremy Zawodny, who reminds us that Google bought its way into the Firefox default with a revenue-sharing agreement. It’s only when someone else plays browser games that default becomes a big deal.

 Second step: Find (or buy) allies. With Google’s dominance of search increasing, BetaNews reports Microsoft has been discussing acquiring a stake in Yahoo. Not everyone in Redmond is on board, but search is going to be commoditized someday, so Microsoft should spend what it takes to catch up. And it is. NYTimes reports that Microsoft spending will rise sharply next year, more than $2 billion over previous estimates, to address the threat. Third step: Get others to replace Google search with MSN Live.com searches, which is what happened with Amazon over the weekend.

People close to Larry and Sergey are worried about Microsoft says John Battelle’s Searchblog. But Google can’t be too concerned since Microsoft announced Windows Vista slipped again to the second quarter of 2007 (via OSNews) and Gartner advises holding off migrating until 2008!

In Web 2.0 news, Yahoo launched it’s first content play in 5 years with a new gadget-review portal called Yahoo Tech. It combines reviews from Consumer Reports, Yahoo users, and in-house advisors like The Mom to compete with Cnet’s reviews. business2blog rounds up a trio of lukewarm reviews. The Spotback personalized news portal launched, claiming to learn from user preferences over time. TechCrunch likes it because users can customize their page, tag stories, ask for more like this, and get Top Stories as rated by all Spotback users. Best of all: no user account because it’s cookie-driven. Michael Arrington also gives the thumbs up to  Sphere, a blog search engine that lets you sort for relevance in lots of ways. Also get ready: Google Press Day is next week and plenty of announcements are expected including Google Health and video in search results says USA Today’s Kevin Maney. What’s next? Google Gum.

And burn rate re-enters the vocabulary as YouTube is rumored to have raised another $25 million in VC while blowing nearly $1 million a month in bandwidth fees alone, writes TechCrunch. At that rate, Valleywag blogs, YouTube will go bankrupt just in time to miss homemade bootlegs of Hillary’s concession speech in 2008.

In politics, the “day without immigrants” went off peacefully as hundreds of thousands rallied around the country for immigrant rights. Daily Kos wraps up major-media coverage here and Facing South covers the thousands who rallied in the Southeast. Up in the Midwest, Michelle Malkin seethes over a University of  Minnesota instructor, Susana De Leon, who used the May Day march to call white people “wetbacks” and posts photos of signs and symbols used by less politically savvy protesters—Che Guevara, anyone? Aztlan?—here and here .

But forget immigration, gas prices, Iran or Iraq. The blogoshphere was aflame over one of the most jaw-dropping public appearances in the modern era. Stephen Colbert is a dangerous man — a bomb thrower, an assassin, a terrorist with boring hair and rimless glasses says Salon and his brilliant performance unplugged the Bush myth machine. His send up of everyone in sight at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner brought a heavily sheltered president face to face with public outrage and revulsion, blogs Scott Rosenberg. But while the Colbert Report may be the best show on television, Colbert’s liberal bias shows through, blogs Huffington Post. Please please, liberals, stop it. You’re embarrassing all of us says Wonkette. It was just a decent standup act with a lousy audience. And it took 4 days but the NY Times finally noticed the ground-breaking, witheringly sarcastic attack says Boing Boing. Catch the whole thing here on Comedy Central Videos.

Categories: Uncategorized

Politics this week: 6th – 12th May 2006

May 11, 2006 Leave a comment

Politics this week

May 11th 2006
From The Economist print edition

Reuters
Reuters

After a poor result for the Labour Party in local elections, Tony Blair, Britain’s prime minister, sought to reassert his authority by reshuffling his cabinet. Among the changes, he removed Jack Straw from the post of foreign secretary (Margaret Beckett becomes the first woman to hold the job), and sacked Charles Clarke, the home secretary. Mr Blair promised there would be an orderly transition to his likely successor, Gordon Brown. But just not yet. See articleE+

The parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee concluded that a lack of resources prevented Britain’s security services from stopping the suicide-bombings that took place in London on July 7th last year. See articleE+

Many European countries expressed concerns over a new Polish government that includes two populist parties of the far left and far right. At least the new coalition, unlike the old, will have a parliamentary majority. See articleE+

Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, gave warning of the malign effect of a shrinking population, and suggested measures to raise the Russian birth rate. In his annual state address, he also called for more defence spending, and reproved external critics and enemies.

Nicolas Sarkozy, France’s interior minister and would-be president, testified to investigating judges in the “Clearstream affair”. President Jacques Chirac expressed total confidence in the government led by Mr Sarkozy’s rival, Dominique de Villepin, but many saw that as a prelude to Mr de Villepin’s departure.

The Middle East Quartet (America, the European Union, Russia and the UN) agreed to a still undefined “temporary mechanism” for getting aid to the Palestinians while bypassing the Palestinian Authority, now run by the Islamists and sometime terrorists of Hamas. Conditions in the West Bank and Gaza deteriorated further when the Israeli firm that provides the Palestinian territories with fuel cut off supplies because it had not been paid. See article

Violence continued unabated in Iraq as the prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, deliberated on the formation of a new cabinet. In the Kurdish region in the north, two old adversaries, Massoud Barzani and Talal Jalabani, decided to form a joint government.

Iran’s president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, opened direct communication with America, cut off after Iran’s 1979 revolution, with a 15-page litany of grievances and no new proposals to end its nuclear dispute with the UN Security Council. Russia and China continued to hold out against a resolution that would threaten sanctions. See articleE+

EPA
EPA

After last week’s peace deal between the Sudanese government and the main rebel group in the Darfur region, America pressed for the UN to send troops to the region as soon as possible. See articleE+

Jacob Zuma, formerly deputy president of South Africa, was cleared of a charge of rape by a court in Johannesburg. His reputation has been diminished by some of his testimony in the trial, and he now faces another trial for corruption in July. See articleE+

Heavy fighting in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, after the collapse of a ceasefire between rival warlords, left hundreds of people dead and wounded.

George Bush nominated air-force General Michael Hayden to head the CIA after the abrupt resignation of Porter Goss. Many in Congress, including senior Republicans, criticised Mr Bush’s choice; General Hayden was in charge of the National Security Agency when a controversial domestic eavesdropping programme was introduced. See articleE+

Mr Bush seemed likely to achieve an extension to his tax cuts on dividends and capital gains as Republicans in Congress agreed to a $70 billion package that also delays the imposition of the alternative minimum tax on 15m upper middle-income families.

The Census Bureau reported that the Hispanic population in the United States had grown to 42.7m in 2005 and accounted for half of the total growth in population since 2004. Births, rather than immigration, provided much of the increase. The data is more grist for the mill in the debate on illegal immigrants.

Venezuela announced yet another tax increase on foreign oil companies, this one on six firms which have invested $17 billion in extracting 600,000 barrels per day of synthetic oil from the Orinoco tar belt. President Hugo Chávez’s government said it would levy taxes and royalties totalling 83.3% on these projects, up from 50.6%.

Óscar Arias took office as Costa Rica’s president, after narrowly winning an election in February. Mr Arias supports ratification of a free-trade agreement with the United States, but may not be able to secure its approval since he lacks a majority in his country’s Congress.

Facing criticism over the nationalisation of Brazilian-operated gasfields in Bolivia, Brazil’s government inaugurated a uranium-enrichment plant capable of producing nuclear fuel. Brazil has forsworn nuclear weapons. It previously sent its uranium to Europe for enrichment.

Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party won a general election for the tenth time in a row. But its share of the vote in contested seats dropped slightly, to 67%. See article

Thailand’s Constitutional Court annulled the general election of April 2nd. It is still not clear when a new election will be held, nor what the position of Thaksin Shinawatra, who resigned as prime minister because of mass public protests, now is. See articleE+

Reuters
Reuters

India’s Communist parties did well in state elections, winning Kerala and holding on to West Bengal. The Communists support the government, but tend to exercise a block on reform. See articleE+

Despite their poor human-rights records, China, Cuba, Pakistan, Russia and Saudi Arabia all won seats on the UN‘s new Human Rights Council. Iran and Venezuela failed to get elected by the General Assembly, while other rights abusers did not even dare try. The United States, which refused to stand, promised to work to ensure the council was effective.

Categories: Uncategorized

Politics this week: 6th – 12th May 2006

May 11, 2006 Leave a comment

Politics this week

May 11th 2006
From The Economist print edition

Reuters
Reuters

After a poor result for the Labour Party in local elections, Tony Blair, Britain’s prime minister, sought to reassert his authority by reshuffling his cabinet. Among the changes, he removed Jack Straw from the post of foreign secretary (Margaret Beckett becomes the first woman to hold the job), and sacked Charles Clarke, the home secretary. Mr Blair promised there would be an orderly transition to his likely successor, Gordon Brown. But just not yet. See articleE+

The parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee concluded that a lack of resources prevented Britain’s security services from stopping the suicide-bombings that took place in London on July 7th last year. See articleE+

Many European countries expressed concerns over a new Polish government that includes two populist parties of the far left and far right. At least the new coalition, unlike the old, will have a parliamentary majority. See articleE+

Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, gave warning of the malign effect of a shrinking population, and suggested measures to raise the Russian birth rate. In his annual state address, he also called for more defence spending, and reproved external critics and enemies.

Nicolas Sarkozy, France’s interior minister and would-be president, testified to investigating judges in the “Clearstream affair”. President Jacques Chirac expressed total confidence in the government led by Mr Sarkozy’s rival, Dominique de Villepin, but many saw that as a prelude to Mr de Villepin’s departure.

The Middle East Quartet (America, the European Union, Russia and the UN) agreed to a still undefined “temporary mechanism” for getting aid to the Palestinians while bypassing the Palestinian Authority, now run by the Islamists and sometime terrorists of Hamas. Conditions in the West Bank and Gaza deteriorated further when the Israeli firm that provides the Palestinian territories with fuel cut off supplies because it had not been paid. See article

Violence continued unabated in Iraq as the prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, deliberated on the formation of a new cabinet. In the Kurdish region in the north, two old adversaries, Massoud Barzani and Talal Jalabani, decided to form a joint government.

Iran’s president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, opened direct communication with America, cut off after Iran’s 1979 revolution, with a 15-page litany of grievances and no new proposals to end its nuclear dispute with the UN Security Council. Russia and China continued to hold out against a resolution that would threaten sanctions. See articleE+

EPA
EPA

After last week’s peace deal between the Sudanese government and the main rebel group in the Darfur region, America pressed for the UN to send troops to the region as soon as possible. See articleE+

Jacob Zuma, formerly deputy president of South Africa, was cleared of a charge of rape by a court in Johannesburg. His reputation has been diminished by some of his testimony in the trial, and he now faces another trial for corruption in July. See articleE+

Heavy fighting in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, after the collapse of a ceasefire between rival warlords, left hundreds of people dead and wounded.

George Bush nominated air-force General Michael Hayden to head the CIA after the abrupt resignation of Porter Goss. Many in Congress, including senior Republicans, criticised Mr Bush’s choice; General Hayden was in charge of the National Security Agency when a controversial domestic eavesdropping programme was introduced. See articleE+

Mr Bush seemed likely to achieve an extension to his tax cuts on dividends and capital gains as Republicans in Congress agreed to a $70 billion package that also delays the imposition of the alternative minimum tax on 15m upper middle-income families.

The Census Bureau reported that the Hispanic population in the United States had grown to 42.7m in 2005 and accounted for half of the total growth in population since 2004. Births, rather than immigration, provided much of the increase. The data is more grist for the mill in the debate on illegal immigrants.

Venezuela announced yet another tax increase on foreign oil companies, this one on six firms which have invested $17 billion in extracting 600,000 barrels per day of synthetic oil from the Orinoco tar belt. President Hugo Chávez’s government said it would levy taxes and royalties totalling 83.3% on these projects, up from 50.6%.

Óscar Arias took office as Costa Rica’s president, after narrowly winning an election in February. Mr Arias supports ratification of a free-trade agreement with the United States, but may not be able to secure its approval since he lacks a majority in his country’s Congress.

Facing criticism over the nationalisation of Brazilian-operated gasfields in Bolivia, Brazil’s government inaugurated a uranium-enrichment plant capable of producing nuclear fuel. Brazil has forsworn nuclear weapons. It previously sent its uranium to Europe for enrichment.

Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party won a general election for the tenth time in a row. But its share of the vote in contested seats dropped slightly, to 67%. See article

Thailand’s Constitutional Court annulled the general election of April 2nd. It is still not clear when a new election will be held, nor what the position of Thaksin Shinawatra, who resigned as prime minister because of mass public protests, now is. See articleE+

Reuters
Reuters

India’s Communist parties did well in state elections, winning Kerala and holding on to West Bengal. The Communists support the government, but tend to exercise a block on reform. See articleE+

Despite their poor human-rights records, China, Cuba, Pakistan, Russia and Saudi Arabia all won seats on the UN‘s new Human Rights Council. Iran and Venezuela failed to get elected by the General Assembly, while other rights abusers did not even dare try. The United States, which refused to stand, promised to work to ensure the council was effective.

Categories: Uncategorized