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Use who you know to help get ahead: ‘The Power of Who’ aims to change how you network

July 1, 2009 Leave a comment

On setting the right priorities in the first place:

“Many of us are working way too hard in jobs we don’t like while pursuing relationships that are actually bad for us and in some cases even living in places we don’t enjoy. If you allow yourself to be fooled into pursuing just position, power, and money, you will miss out on the true treasures of peace, happiness, and a deep-down contentment.”

On changing the trajectory of our lives:

“One of the big lies many of us tell ourselves is that our current position in life disqualifies us from achieving our dreams and goals. Some of the common phrases I’ve heard are “It’s too late for me. I’m too old,” or “I’m too young,” or “I’m too…whatever.” Is that true? No! It’s absolutely not true. You’re never too early or late in life to begin walking on the pathway of your dream. One thing is absolutely certain: the future is on the way. Ready or not, here it comes.”

On investing in your “Who”:

“Do you know your ‘Who?’ I’ve developed a database of over 5,365 people that can say “Hi, Bob.” That really doesn’t mean a lot except that I know a lot of people because of my business. I had what I thought was a great networking strategy, but I discovered I was dead wrong. One day I stopped and studied who had actually given me business or touched my life in some significant way over the last ten years. I was shocked to learn that there were only 87! Eighty-seven out of 5,365! I enjoy meeting people, but I should have been spending more time investing in the 87 who were actually impacting my life in significant ways.”

On getting what we really want:

“Most people never get what they want for three simple reasons. They don’t ask. No one can help if they don’t know what you want. When they do ask, they ask the wrong people. For some reason, people are uncomfortable asking their ‘Who’ for help. As a result, they’ll ask most anyone except their friends, who are the only ones with a motive to help. When they do ask for help, they ask too vaguely. Even if I’m motivated to help a friend, I can’t do it when I don’t know what he or she wants.”

Beaudine’s four tips for networking


1 Do I know you?
References, endorsements and testimonials are your greatest allies when applying for jobs. A recommendation from a friend reveals more about your character and work ethic than someone who barely knows you personally, such as a previous boss.

2 Do I like you?
Can you really build a relationship with someone in a few minutes? If your interviewer has heard about you from a mutual friend, they’ll feel like they know you better right away.

3 Can I trust that you understand my needs?

Do your homework on the interviewer. Know what they need and prepare for answers that show you can fill their needs. A friend’s recommendation can prove you’re trustworthy.

4 Are you the best for me in my particular situation?
Show passion for the job and your work. People want to work with those they can become friends. If your interviewer knows a friend that describes your personality and love of your field, they’ll be more comfortable hiring you.


We’re told that getting a job isn’t about what you know, but who you know. Networking is crucial when job hunting, or so we thought. But one man is challenging that belief, saying the only networking you need to do is with friends you already have.

Bob Beaudine, President and CEO of Eastman & Beaudine, and a top executive recruiter in sports and entertainment, discusses this new approach to networking in his book, “The Power of Who: You Already Know Everyone You Need to Know” (Center Street, $20).

“I wrote the book because I want to help, and to do that we first need to change the way we network,” says Beaudine. “Networking is the greatest thing in the world, just not the way we do it.”

“The Power of Who” is all about finding your “who” and using them to get to the next step.

Everyone has a “who”: List everyone you know, and then narrow the list down to those you consider friends.

Out of 5,265 people he knows, Beaudine only considers 87 part of his “who.”

“Identify your who, decide what you want, and connect,” he says. “Have your friends help you connect. This is already in place for us and doesn’t cost anything.”

Sounds too simple? It is. “Sometimes the most profound ideas are the simplest,” says Beaudine.

“We’ve left all the people who know us, like us, and are rooting for us, and instead network with people who don’t know anything about us.”

When consulting your “who,” know which ones to ask for help, and be clear. Your friends can’t help if you don’t tell them what you want.

And in this tough job market, your “who” might be just what you needed. “How many people do you need to get your dream job?” says Beaudine. “One, and that’s hope.”

Beaudine’s four tips for networking

1 Do I know you?
References, endorsements and testimonials are your greatest allies when applying for jobs. A recommendation from a friend reveals more about your character and work ethic than someone who barely knows you personally, such as a previous boss.

2 Do I like you?
Can you really build a relationship with someone in a few minutes? If your interviewer has heard about you from a mutual friend, they’ll feel like they know you better right away.

3 Can I trust that you understand my needs?

Do your homework on the interviewer. Know what they need and prepare for answers that show you can fill their needs. A friend’s recommendation can prove you’re trustworthy.

4 Are you the best for me in my particular situation?
Show passion for the job and your work. People want to work with those they can become friends. If your interviewer knows a friend that describes your personality and love of your field, they’ll be more comfortable hiring you.

HC bans manual cleaning of sewage lines

October 17, 2008 Leave a comment
அனந்த நாராயணன் என்பவர் தொடுத்த வழக்கில், பாதாள சாக்கடையில் நேரடியாக மனிதர்களை இறக்கி கழிவை அகற்றுவதை உ.நீதி மன்றம் தடை செய்திருக்கிறது.
 
நடைமுறையில் இந்த வழக்கமிருப்பதை அறிந்தால் அதை உடனே அறியப்படுத்துவது மிக முக்கியமானது. அ.நாராயணனை தொடர்பு கொள்ள teaminforse(at)yahoo (dot)com
இது குறித்த தகவல்கள், பரிந்துரைகள், ஆதரவுகளை எழுதுங்கள். சில மேல் விவரங்களுக்கு என்னை தொடர்பு கொள்ளலாம்.
(தொடர்ச்சி) to take them away from this type of job, that can be suggested.
d)Concrete suggestions on prevention, education and more importantly, specific rehabilitation measures for these communities
c) Other deaths in septic tanks in tanneries, households, factories etc and whether compensation given or not.
(தொடர்ச்சி) whether applied to the Dy Commissioner of Labour for compensation under the Workman’s compensation act.
b) If compensation not given, the reasons for the same. Details like the local body involved, the contractor details,
(தொடர்ச்சி) and whether compensations have been given or not by the concerned dept.
( தொடர்ச்சி) in municipalities, corporations, Metrowater and in TWAD in the past years, with proper proof like FIR,Postmartem if any
a) To compile the list and particulars of workers who have died doing sewerage work across Tamilnadu
   
 
சட்டத்தடையிருந்தும், நடைமுறையில் ஒழிக்க நடவடிக்கைகள் தேவைப்படுகிறது. இது குறித்து அ.நாராயணனிடமிருந்து கிடைத்த மின்னஞ்சலில் இருந்து மேலே சில